Monthly Archives: August 2017

Carbohydrates: Complex Carbs vs. Simple Carbs

carbs-in-foods

Carbohydrates are the main source of calories in a healthy diet and are the primary fuel for the brain and muscles. Typically, about three-fourths of daily calories should come from carbohydrates. It’s also important to choose the best carbohydrate sources. That means two things:

• Choose complex carbohydrates, rather than simple carbohydrates.
• Choose carbohydrates that still have their fiber, like brown rice or brown bread, rather than white rice or white bread, from which the fiber has been stripped away.

Complex Carbohydrates

Complex carbohydrates may be referred to as dietary starch and are made of sugar molecules strung together like a necklace or branched like a coil. They are often rich in fiber, thus satisfying and health promoting. Complex carbohydrates are commonly found in whole plant foods and, therefore, are also often high in vitamins and minerals.

Simple Carbohydrates

Simple carbohydrates are sugars. All simple carbohydrates are made of just one or two sugar molecules. They are the quickest source of energy, as they are very rapidly digested.

Getting the Best Carb-Rich Foods

Choose whole, unprocessed foods from plant sources. Choosing whole fruit instead of juice, a whole-grain side dish instead of crackers, and fresh vegetables instead of potato chips will ensure you are getting complex carbohydrates, complete with fiber, vitamins, and minerals. Remember also that all types of meat and eggs are essentially devoid of carbohydrates.

When buying packaged foods, check food labels for the word “whole” in front of the word “grain” and make sure that corn syrup or one of the other simple carbohydrates listed above doesn’t appear among the first few ingredients on the list.

Carbs

Got happiness? Enjoying life boosts your health!

smiling

Enjoying your life doesn’t just put a smile on your face. It’s good for your health!

Life satisfaction, enjoyment of life, optimism, and other aspects that make up what researchers call “subjective well-being” may profoundly affect health. Positive emotions, both passing happiness and longer-term contentment, seem to make us more resilient to stress and are linked to healthier behaviors as well as better cardiovascular health and improved immune system functioning. Good feelings may even slow down the aging process itself.

Of course, unlike clothes, books, and blenders, good vibes can’t be ordered with the click of a button, and “don’t worry, be happy” is easier said than done. You have to generate good feelings. Healthy daily routines, like regular exercise and good sleep habits, can produce feel-good brain chemicals and lower stress hormones.

Make sure your relationships support your happiness, too, by investing in the ones that make you feel good — and divesting from the ones that don’t.

Adding a mindfulness meditation practice to your routine will help you manage the inevitable stresses of life and keep you feeling good. Don’t know how to meditate? Try this:

1. Sit or lie comfortably.
2. Close your eyes.
3. Make no effort to control the breath; simply breathe naturally.
4. Focus your attention on the breath and on how the body moves with each inhalation and exhalation. Notice the movement of your body as you breathe. Observe your chest, shoulders, rib cage, and belly. Simply focus your attention on your breath without controlling its pace or intensity. If your mind wanders, return your focus back to your breath.

Maintain this meditation practice for two to three minutes to start, and then try it for longer periods.

Sleep Is Good Medicine

sleep

Sleeping together makes for a more harmonious relationship — and better health. And we mean sleeping in the literal sense! New research shows that insufficient shut-eye can amp up hostility between partners and make relationship conflicts more damaging to your health. It’s not all that surprising when you consider how grumpy you feel after a bad night’s sleep, right?

To find out how sleep quality affects romantic relationships and health, researchers interviewed 49 couples and asked how many hours they’d slept the previous two nights. Then they took blood samples, had each couple discuss a topic that tended to provoke conflict, and then took a second blood sample. Those who hadn’t had much sleep had a greater inflammatory response, which over time is associated with conditions like heart disease, diabetes, and arthritis. In fact, for every missed hour of sleep, levels of two inflammatory markers rose by 6 percent! And when both spouses slept less than 7 hours, the couple was more likely to argue, making the situation worse.

Think of sleep, relationship harmony, and physical health as a kind of “love triangle.” Work together on following good sleep habits, and if either of you has a sleep disorder such as sleep apnea, be sure to see a physician for treatment. The couple that sleeps together may just stay healthy together!